In this episode of Art of the Kickstart, we sat down with Arman Assadi, CEO and co-founder of EVO Planner, a company that individualizes the day-planning experience. Comprised of a personalized planner and app, their mission is to help users organize their thoughts, articulate goals and define successes based on their brain type. Tune in to hear the process Arman took to garner backer support before, during and after EVO Planner’s Kickstarter campaign. Also, learn about the pitfalls and successes they encountered as well as tips for startups looking to crowdfund.

Topics Discussed and Key Crowdfunding Takeaways

  • The process they used to decide what features to include in EVO Planner
  • The biggest challenge when designing a physical product as well as an app
  • The strategy to crowdfund EVO Planner before their Kickstarter campaign to gain early support
  • How they drew on Facebook groups and influencer marketing in conjunction with their overall communication plan
  • Why they went from Kickstarter to Indiegogo before moving on to ecommerce

Links

Sponsors

Art of the Kickstart is honored to be sponsored by The Gadget Flow, a product discovery platform that helps you discover, save, and buy awesome products. The Gadget Flow is the ultimate buyer’s guide for cool luxury gadgets and creative gifts. Click here to learn more and list your product – use coupon code ATOKK16 for 20% off!

Transcript

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Roy Morejon:
Coming into Art of the Kickstart, your source for crowdfunding campaign success. I’m your host, Roy Morejon, president of Enventys Partners, the top full-service turnkey product development and crowdfunding marketing agency in the world. We have helped startups raise over $100 million for our clients since 2010. Each week, I’ll interview a crowdfunding success story, an inspirational entrepreneur, or a business expert in order to help you take your startup to the next level with crowdfunding. Art of the Kickstart is honored to be sponsored by Gadget Flow. The Gadget Flow is a product discovery platform that helps you discover, save, and buy awesome products. It is the ultimate buyer’s guide for cool luxury gadgets and creative gifts. Now let’s get on with the show.
Roy Morejon:
Welcome to another edition of Art of the Kickstart. Today I am super excited because I am talking with Arman Assadi co-founder and CEO of EVO Planner, the first personalized flow system. Arman, thank you so much for being on the show today.
Arman Assadi:
Thanks Roy. I’m excited. Let’s do it.
Roy Morejon:
You don’t sound excited, Arman, I mean, you guys raised over a million dollars on your crowdfunding campaign. Come on.
Arman Assadi:
I mean, I could do a little dance for you if you want, but you won’t see it.
Roy Morejon:
Let’s dance.
Arman Assadi:
Absolutely, man. Absolutely.
Roy Morejon:
So you guys did a campaign not too long ago on Kickstarter, over 6,000 backers, $367,000 raised on it. Really excited to talk about where did this product start from, with you and your co-founder, Chad, give me an idea of what inspired you guys to create the EVO Planner.
Arman Assadi:
Pain, honestly. And I think all entrepreneurial journeys start with pain. Either seeing a pain in another person, someone you love, someone in your community, or a pain in yourself and needing to scratch your own itch. So the pain for us started, I’d say it was two different segments.
Arman Assadi:
One was just already being in this world of entrepreneurship, self-development, and seeing so many tools and resources and education, and kind of just observing the hypocrisy where everything was distributed in a way where you were told this is the silver bullet, the answer, the number one thing that’s going to help you. And I just couldn’t help, in the back of my mind because I love philosophy, I love looking at things from a very macro level, and I just couldn’t help but think to myself this is BS. Because every single one of us is different, and what works for me may not work for you. And I just marinated on that idea for years and years. And so that was one aspect of it.
Arman Assadi:
The other aspect of it is I used to actually be an employee. I think I was okay for the first part of it. But eventually, I felt like I was stuck in a box, and I was unfulfilled in what I did. And I worked my way all the way up the ladder, got a job at Google, thought this was success and this is all there is. And all of a sudden I found myself kind of empty and very unfulfilled and very misaligned. So the second component of it was helping people find alignment and flow in their work. And it came from my personal pain of just being miserable at work in what I did on a daily basis.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah, I think some of the best products come out of pain points, right? Scratching that itch or solving that problem that’s in your life that likely millions of others have as well. Right? So let’s talk about the process of deciding what features to include in the planner. I mean, you weren’t a planner before. How did you guys go about creating this product?
Arman Assadi:
Yeah. So Chad and I were working on the concepts and the framework behind what is today the company project EVO for years actually. And it started with a methodology that helped people, with an assessment really. First thing we wanted to do was create an assessment tool very uniquely the way that we wanted to position it in the marketplace.
Arman Assadi:
But after working on that assessment for years, we thought to ourselves, well, what is the entry point into the marketplace? What is a tool, a physical product, that we can create? And for a long time, Chad was going to these conferences and getting these planners passed out to him. And he started thinking about, well what if we had a planner that used our framework somehow.
Arman Assadi:
So we got together and started looking at everything. And I was like, well shit, this is going to be really interesting and very unique, but very challenging to essentially create a planner based on your personality. What do we do about all these skews? What do we do about the differentiation? And then we started talking about technology as a component of it to provide data and a feedback loop.
Arman Assadi:
And next thing you know it was like feature, feature, feature, feature, feature. And we were really sort of packing it with value. So a part of what I do is I have a very strategic mind, and I had to sit down and say what does an initial MVP of this look like? How do we make sure that people actually want this? How do we make sure that we can get real feedback from our customers and future customers?
Arman Assadi:
And then we really started to shape the vision of what it’s become today, which is essentially you take, what we call, our brain type assessment. After taking the brain type assessment, and by the way, you don’t have to. I think some people assume that they have to take the brain type assessment. They actually don’t. If you just want to look through the four different types of planners that we have and choose one that’s actually okay. Because again, we’re not saying this is it. You’re an Alchemist for the rest of your life based on this brief assessment.
Arman Assadi:
And then based on that, there is a planner that is designed to the way that you process information, organize information, and think the way you most naturally think. And then we accompany that with an app that was insane to create and grueling and expensive, but absolutely well worth it because it’s a valuable tool, and it really differentiates us in the marketplace. And that app tracks each day.
Arman Assadi:
So you take a picture essentially of your planner page each day, and you fill out your performance. And those questions are unique to you based on your planner. Because what it’s essentially doing is it’s helping you thrive based on what you and your brain type need the most.
Roy Morejon:
So what would you say was your biggest challenge you guys encountered when you were designing, I guess not only the physical product, but the app as well.
Arman Assadi:
Oh my God. The biggest one? There were so many, man. There were so many challenges. I would say one thing that was a challenge, but also really fun was going to China, and actually going to our manufacturer. Wouldn’t recommend anyone go to China right now at the time of this recording with everything going on.
Arman Assadi:
But it was a challenge because we didn’t know what we were getting into. It was the first time, I’ve never manufactured a product before like this. And actually just getting there, going there, meeting people, having translation done for us. Thank God we had a sourcing partner who could handle a lot of the logistics.
Arman Assadi:
But it was so worth it to go through that. The costs, the effort, the challenge of it all because when we got there, it’s just different when you’re in person with people. And when we got there we thought we knew what the final design of our planner was going to look like. But we went into one of the offices of our factory, and we saw tons of samples of material. Materials that could be used for the cover of our planner.
Arman Assadi:
And something just kind of made me start pulling the books off the shelf and looking through and touching the samples. And Chad and I were just kind of sitting there doing this. And we just all of a sudden stumbled on one that we were like, whoa, this is different. This is really unique. And it sounds like such a small thing, but it’s all the small things that accumulate in your product experience together that create your product experience.
Arman Assadi:
I still to this day see people say like, “Oh my God, I love the feel and the texture of the EVO Planner.” And it makes me smile because I’m like, “Man, you don’t know what it took to get that. You don’t know the serendipitous moment that had to happen for you to have that type of material in your hands because I’d never seen it before. And it took going through 100 of them there at the site.”
Arman Assadi:
So there were so many challenges with the planner. Fulfillment is, man, I don’t know how much people curse on the show, but it was insane. And it still is to this day. I want to actually make that clear. The process of doing a crowdfunding campaign is one thing. The process of then actually creating a company that’s sustainable and a true e-commerce business is a whole other level that comes after crowdfunding that people don’t talk about nearly enough because that’s an even bigger challenge.
Arman Assadi:
But dealing with fulfillment, freight forwarding, shipping, getting it to your customers, understanding the nuances of how that all works, these logistics are so important. And I would say that was the biggest challenge with the planner and still continues to be. It’s something that I can never develop enough expertise in.
Arman Assadi:
And then the app is just, I mean it’s technology, man. One of the most helpful things I learned with development so far, and I’ve done a lot of development now, whether it be websites. I don’t actually do the development, but I’m a CEO and I’ve done a lot of consulting as well. I’ve been involved in a lot of projects. And someone said to me, “The 99-yard line, when you think you’re at the 99-yard line, you’re really at the 10-yard line of your project.”
Arman Assadi:
The last one to ten percent of a development sprint or project is the most difficult. That’s where all the true work shows up because you’re there to create a final stitched together product experience. And the QA, the details, that’s where all the energy goes. And so that was a big challenge with the app.
Arman Assadi:
And the other big challenge with the app is product management is not simple. Understanding how to create the critical path in an app for a user so that they’re not overwhelmed by features is also a huge learning. You want to give them one thing. And again this is something that probably dozens of people on your podcast have already said, right? It makes your product experience simple. Really make it clear what it’s designed to do. Don’t overwhelm them with features. But it’s different in practice.
Arman Assadi:
So I’m telling you, if you’re a listener, or you’ve done this before, you haven’t done this before, the next time you do, really fight yourself and the people around you to focus on one main unique value proposition, and do that one thing really freaking well. Let’s just say for us it’s the scanning of the image on the planner. Our app being able to scan and transfer the data and store the data. Do that one thing really, really, really well, and wow your customers. And then, based on what they say, and the overwhelming majority of them requesting the next feature, build that. If I would’ve done it again, I would not have included at least two to three features that we included in our app upfront.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah, I think that’s incredibly insightful, Arman. And I think you guys put that also into practice, kind of moving into this in terms of the marketing work that you guys did for this campaign. We heard you speak at Digital Marketer. Can you go into a little bit in terms of the plan that you put into place for the product launch in terms of utilizing the private Facebook community to create ambassadors, and then using the strategy of a beta audience. And then that $5 reservation that you guys were able to do for it to have such a massive and impactful day one on the campaign launch?
Arman Assadi:
Yeah, sure. Absolutely. And I can give you kind of the big picture. I’m happy to go into details. It’s so funny. I was at an event this weekend and getting asked about this exact topic of walk me through your prelaunch. So hey, once this is recorded, I’ll have to send it to that entrepreneur that was asking. That be perfect. So that I don’t have to go through it. And I’ll do even a better job here.
Arman Assadi:
So at a high level, what I would say is do it all. Do it all. Everything you’ve ever heard that you should do, do it. And the reason for that is because you don’t know what’s going to really create momentum for you and your audience. The other aspect of it is you don’t actually know what you might end up doing really well.
Arman Assadi:
And what I mean by that is, let’s just say there are many components. So some of them are, let’s do some influencer marketing. Let’s do some Facebook group stuff. Let’s do some offline stuff, getting people offline like involved. Let’s do some get people to reserve in advance. Let’s do paid acquisition. Across the spectrum of everything that you can do, you don’t know what you’ll end up enjoying. And the thing that you end up enjoying often is the thing that gets results. That’s one thing.
Arman Assadi:
The other thing is you don’t know what the audience, and your audience for your exact product, is going to respond to best. And in this day and age where Kickstarter and Indiegogo are becoming even more challenging. You probably know a lot more about this than I do Roy, but since we’ve done our campaign, I’ve read it’s become slightly more challenging in general. And the marketplace, it’s just more competitive.
Arman Assadi:
So to stand out, I’m actually curious about that. Maybe you can talk about that a little bit. But to stand out, it requires doing it all. And think of it like an investment portfolio. You don’t go all in on one thing. That would be insane. You’re at risk, right? You have to diversify your investing so that if one thing breaks, another thing is ready to be there.
Arman Assadi:
If your reservation funnel, or your leads that you captured via email, or your leads that you captured via Facebook messenger, if it doesn’t work on day one, you’re F-ed. So you’ve got to have these other things that you have in your toolkit as ammunition ready to fire. So we did them all. It was really hard. I’m probably overwhelming somebody when they’re hearing this right now. They’re like, shit, I was planning on just doing a little bit of this and that, and hoping that it would take off. No, no.
Arman Assadi:
The first thing I said on the stage at Digital Marketer, this event that you mentioned, when they say, “How was your campaign, you guys raised all this money.” I was like, “It was super, super challenging. It’s hard work. I’m so glad I did it. My future is now in my hands. We have all these raving fan customers. But I don’t want people to get this misconception that you just kind of do this and do that and make a nice video.” Oh yeah, video. That’s another component. “And you make a nice video, and then all of a sudden Kickstarter loves you, and it takes off.”
Arman Assadi:
But I did it all. I was ready to fly to meet the Kickstarter guys. I really tried to build a relationship. We sent them product. I’m really good with people in business development, but the Kickstarter folks are not helpful. I hope they’re listening. They need to be more helpful. They need to build more relationships with their actual entrepreneurs. I thought that was kind of a shame that they weren’t more involved. Because Indiegogo was much more involved. They were really helpful.
Arman Assadi:
But it’s they’re bigger. I get it. They’re bigger, they’re busier. I get it. But that’s another thing we did. We sent product to Kickstarter, tried to get featured that way. That didn’t really work. So yeah, I’m happy to break down any of these components. But I would say among the most valuable in the end, definitely without having done paid acquisition to get leads that were specifically interested in the planner, I don’t think we would’ve been successful the way we were that were. That was probably [inaudible 00:17:25].
Roy Morejon:
So on on day one you guys had over 1,300 backers. And you guys did over 42K on launch day. At the conference, you had spoke about collecting a $5 commitment pledge. What software did you guys use for this? Or talk me through the funnel process of what you built for that.
Arman Assadi:
Okay. Yeah, so we essentially developed just a basic landing page on WordPress and I think it was basically just like a Stripe checkout. And we had the landing page describe… It was very elusive. I might be able to pull it up. It’s probably gone by now. But it was a very elusive page.
Arman Assadi:
It was just this new exciting planner is coming. Be first in line, get the best pricing ever. And they would click. We tested many ways. We tested get the email up front, just the email. We tested get $10 upfront. We tested get $1 upfront. We tested get $5. I think we landed on $5 because almost there was no difference between one and five. So we were like, let’s just get five because there’ll be more invested.
Arman Assadi:
And then I think it just led to a Stripe checkout. And we got the email, obviously, because they made a purchase. And that was really it. And some of these happened months and months and months in advance of the campaign. And obviously we were running this all the way up until the campaign started. Your email marketing is really important. So we sent emails to keep them warm. We had to think a lot about content and keeping it warm.
Arman Assadi:
And for the people that joined at the very beginning, there was a long waiting period until we were finally ready to launch. Right? It was almost feeling like, oh, we’re already in business. We’ve got to treat this like we’re a brand already. They’ve opted into project EVO as a company. They want to know who is Arman, who is Chad, what is this all about, who’s involved, how did you guys create your brain types?
Arman Assadi:
So we had to educate, and I thought that was really helpful. I think that was really smart in the end where we continued engaging with them. Don’t let the leads become cold. And sending these prelaunch emails once you get closer. I would say in my experience, I’ve done a lot of launches. You don’t want to go too far in advance because then it’s just like, come on, let’s get this over with. Let’s go. So maybe one week, first teaser, 10 days max.
Arman Assadi:
And then you really want to hit it on launch day. And then essentially, I think you’re alluding to this, but essentially what happens is for people that don’t understand the next component it’s, well you get to launch day, you have these leads, they’ve opted in, they’ve put $5 down imagine. And they don’t have to by the way, but I really do recommend it. At least it worked really well for us.
Arman Assadi:
So they put in $5, or let’s just say it depends on the price of your product. The price of our product, it’s now 45. I think on Kickstarter it was 30, 35. I can’t quite remember. So they’re essentially doing a down payment. When the launch happens, you send an email to these people, and you say, when this goes live, go to this special product listing on Kickstarter that’s just for you, and pay the remainder of your, I believe it was $20. So 25, they were getting the best price ever. So pay the remainder of your $20 to Kickstarter, and you will be first in line. And then we had other packages for them, a four-pack and special things like that. But that was the needle mover on day one. I think we hit our funding goal in 27 minutes because of that. So it was stoked. Really, really cool.
Roy Morejon:
So in terms of segmentation, and we talk about email marketing, so for the folks who were pledging a dollar, five, or ten did you separately segment those folks out in terms of hey, this is what your $10 is going towards? Or was that audience all kind of grouped into one upon launch day where they all got the early bird special messaging?
Arman Assadi:
I think they all got the early bird special messaging. And I believe it was just something on the backend that allowed them to select the proper amount that they owed.
Roy Morejon:
So in terms of on launch day, super successful hitting your funding goal ridiculously fast, with 1,300 backers confirmed on day one, I’m assuming you guys had pre-campaign commitments in the tens of thousands.
Arman Assadi:
Yeah. I wish I remember how many leads. We have a lot of leads now. But yeah, I need to know that. I would say it was probably maybe 20,000 lead. No, that sounds like too much. But yeah, it had to be up there. It had to be up there. But it wasn’t so much about the leads as it was about the number of reservations.
Arman Assadi:
Honestly, I remember we were like, these leads are nice and all, but what actually ended up being the most useful was the reservation people. And the leads were good because many of them still throughout the campaign did eventually end up buying. But some of those people, they’re just not ready. They ended up buying months later on Indiegogo. So it still was valuable to to do the lead gen. But I think the reservation piece is what gets people the most committed on day one.
Arman Assadi:
And these days, I mean man, I was thinking about this a lot recently. I was like, I think if I was going to do it over again, I would probably build a text message list. I would build an SMS list. because I’m doing that right now for my personal brand. I just started doing that on Instagram, and it is fire. It’s incredible. This whole world is changing.
Arman Assadi:
Oh, and then a lot of those people that we had were from Facebook messenger. So they weren’t just email, Roy, they were also Facebook messenger people. So those people, that was really valuable because especially with Facebook messenger, kind of similar to text, the open rate is so much higher. You’d be lucky if you have a huge email list, and get 10% open rate. You’d be very lucky. That’s a good ratio. I think at that point we were getting a 25%, 30% open rate. But still with Facebook messenger, you’re getting people, very high open rate above 80%. Much higher, maybe 10X the click-through rate of what you get on email. And with text, it’s even higher. It’s even higher.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah. It’s a guaranteed open rate. So talk to me a little bit then about the private Facebook community that you guys used and made to create the brand ambassadors. I’m assuming the funnel system kind of flowed into there. So all of these folks could kind of communicate together, and talk about themselves or entrepreneurs or habits that they have they’re trying to work on.
Arman Assadi:
That’s an example of having, in the interim between starting the lead gen, and the excitement for the campaign and launching, that’s an example of what I meant by building the business, building the brand, building the community. It was all these things. So yes, it was the reservation funnel. Yes, it was getting Facebook messenger people. But it was also, even a lot of them that purchase were just from that Facebook group that you’re mentioning. Because those people were really engaged and in love with their brain types and each other and the brand and us.
Arman Assadi:
So, we built a Facebook group where we didn’t let everyone in. We required them to answer questions, and we positioned it as this is a very special, very private group where we’re going to have open vulnerable conversations. And our Facebook group is amazing. It still is to this day. It’s incredible the things that people post. So yeah, you just see such a depth of humanity in there. And that really did build brand ambassadors and people that were really excited to promote the brand.
Arman Assadi:
So there was another aspect of organic growth that is impossible to measure. So many people talk to each other about their EVO Planner all the time. I hear it all the time. And especially because of the component of that, they’re are different. What are you, I’m an Alchemist. And people want to find out.
Arman Assadi:
So if there’s a way people can differentiate, or create some form of personalization, I really believe in that. I see a lot of companies doing that. I think we were kind of early. I think it was still wide open. And I do believe that from a fundamental level, like I said, the itch that was I scratching in the beginning, personalization, I really believe in that. I think that products, services need to be personalized to the end-user for them to actually work. And I think that’s what people want. They want to be seen and heard. So yeah, all that stuff really helped.
Roy Morejon:
Absolutely. So earlier we were talking about diversification of your marketing and getting your message out there. I guess, instead of just putting all of your eggs into the Facebook ad bucket, which pretty much every six figure campaign kind of has to, what were some of the other stokes in the fire, if you will, that you guys put into prelaunch to either make it more personal to folks, or getting folks more excited about the launch coming up?
Arman Assadi:
Sending people planners, getting it in the hands of influencers. I had been fortunate enough to have developed a lot of great relationships with some amazing influencers. So getting various people to tweet, to share, to talk to their audience, to email their lists. I also come from a background of, like I said, having done a lot of these product launches, whether it be a SaaS product or information product course, or e-commerce. And so I’ve seen what creates success there.
Arman Assadi:
And I was able to just kind of between myself and Chad just get the planner in people’s hands as early as possible. So that on day one, part of our strategy was, or right the day before, we’d hit them up, and say, “Hey, we’re going live tomorrow. Do what you can. Support us. It would mean the world.”
Arman Assadi:
And that again, very hard to measure, very hard to measure. How would I ever know the impact of Neil Patel’s tweet? I just don’t. I didn’t use a tracking link. He’s just a friend. I wasn’t going to complicate it for him. It’s just like, thanks. Appreciate it. So various things like that. Also I wouldn’t underestimate the impact of influencers in the sense of it doesn’t have to be this big brand name, this big household name. There’s a lot of people that are just very influential in their communities. And we also are friends with a lot of those people, and I think that that’s really valuable as well.
Arman Assadi:
Who are the people that are evangelists for things that they believe in. Get it into their hands because they’ll talk about it, they’ll share it. If they’re a coach, if they’re a consultant, if they’re a community leader. Getting it into that person’s hands, another thing we thought a lot about was who are the people that our networks in and of themselves. Someone who leads a community of coaches or consultants. And then you think about your end user.
Arman Assadi:
Well for us, entrepreneurs are a segment of our audience for sure. High performers. It’s really the umbrella, at a big picture, is self-development, right? But people that are into personal development, but it’s entrepreneurs, it’s creatives. And another segment of it is people that just want a beautiful planner. A lot of our customers, actually the majority, are women. Whether they’re entrepreneurs or not, but they just need and love planners.
Arman Assadi:
So identifying who those people are and getting it into the hands of the people that have a voice in those communities. So we did a lot of that. So much so that I literally can’t remember. I mean we must’ve given out hundreds of planners to anyone that we could.
Roy Morejon:
Nice. So digressing a little, let’s just jump to the end. After the Kickstarter campaign ended, you had mentioned migrating your campaign over to Indiegogo in demand. And you guys are pretty much crushed it over, raising another 650K-ish. Talk to me about the process of why you guys decided to go that route, and what was the process like in terms of staying in demand for so long until you guys were ready to ship the product?
Arman Assadi:
So I think we shipped product in June. We did our Kickstarter in January. We were shooting for April, I believe, April or May. It took until June, just like it does for everybody. And it’s so funny because we were so confident in our ability to… Another thing about us is we weren’t waiting for the money from Kickstarter to go manufacturer. We were already manufacturing. We’re already prototyping, we’re doing all that stuff.
Arman Assadi:
And that’s something that I believe gets talked about a lot, but I just want to remind people. It’s like most of the big campaigns, if you’re going big, having some investment to first go and get a small batch made, and know that you’re ready to go is very important. Otherwise, people don’t want to wait a year or that long. It just frustrates them obviously.
Arman Assadi:
So I think our first product arrived into the hands of people by June. And where we overestimated was I thought, okay, by April, May, it’s in their hands, but you got to add in the time, it was the first experience, oh, the boat. Oh, the warehouse. And Amazon receives it for the first time. They need a whole month because it’s their first time, and they don’t know what they’re doing, and it has to have the right labels, and all these things happen that you just can’t predict them actually.
Arman Assadi:
So once we actually got it in their hands, I think wave one was in May or June. And then the second one was immediately after, I want to say July. But when we transitioned over to Indiegogo, the reason for that was, well, it was just kind of a seamless transition. You can essentially take everything that’s on Kickstarter and just hit copy paste and move it over. Price has to go up a little bit, I believe, in all of that so that you’re giving Kickstarter the best deal.
Arman Assadi:
But I think of it as an interim e-commerce solution. So once we transitioned over to Indiegogo, we began building our e-commerce. Okay, what do we want to do? I think we want to do Shopify for the planner. Well, what else do we want to include in this company, in this business? What is the future of this business? So give us a little bit of time to sit down and strategize about that component, I was mentioning earlier, about you’ve got to think about the type of company you actually want to build after the crowdfunding phase.
Arman Assadi:
But what ended up happening, Roy, is our ads were converting, our campaigns were converting, the virality of the planner was taking off. And so we didn’t see a good reason to switch things off because it was still working. And we got to a point with Indiegogo where we were really treating it like e-commerce. I don’t remember what month, but it was probably, I think when we were fully in stock was August, September or something like that.
Arman Assadi:
And if someone bought on Indiegogo, they were receiving their planner two days later. So it was as if we were on Shopify. It was the same thing. And I believe we started testing on our Shopify versus Indiegogo, and just saw that at that point there was something about Indiegogo that was still working. So we just treated it like an e-commerce platform for a while.
Arman Assadi:
Obviously one of the pains of it is they take a huge chunk of fees. But, oh, I do remember this, I pretty much strong armed Indiegogo. I was like, look, “I’m ready to turn this off and go to Shopify unless you keep promoting.” And this is what I was saying earlier about them being cool about helping their entrepreneurs.
Arman Assadi:
So something like every two weeks they were featuring us in their emails and in their newsletter, in their number one spot, number two spot, number three spot. And then we’d see a 10K pop, 20K pop just from that. So I was like, well, I’d be losing that if we go off Indiegogo. So that was really nice. And I recommend everybody do that. Get in touch with your campaign manager, and ask. Either pay for a spot, or say, “Look at my performance, look at how we’re doing, promote us.” Not as direct as that, but you know what I mean?
Roy Morejon:
Solid. Audience, thanks again for tuning in. I know you loved this episode as much as I did. Make sure to check out artofthekickstart.com for the notes, the transcript, links to everything we talked about today. And of course thank you to our crowdfunding podcast sponsors the Gadget Flow and ProductHype. Arman, thank you so much for being on the show today, man.
Roy Morejon:
Thanks for tuning into another episode of Art of the Kickstart, the show about building a business world and life with crowdfunding. If you’ve enjoyed today’s episode, awesome. Make to visit artofthekickstart.com and tell us all about it. There you’ll find additional information about past episodes, our Kickstarter guide to crushing it. And of course, if you loved this episode a lot, leave us a review at artofthekickstart.com/iTunes. It helps more inventors, entrepreneurs, and startups find this show, and helps us get better guests to help you build a better business. If you need more hands on crowdfunding strategy advice, please feel free to request a quote on enventyspartners.com. Thanks again for tuning in and we’ll see you again next week.