In this episode of Art of the Kickstart, we interviewed Dr. Shafiq Zaib (aka Dr. Zee), founder of Baxbag, a sustainable and posture-correcting backpack. Made from eco-friendly materials, BaxBag’s patent-pending design help reduce back pain related to carrying traditional backpacks. Listen in and learn about the brand’s product development journey and its road to crowdfunding.

Topics Discussed and Key Crowdfunding Takeaways

  • Dr. Zee’s background in naturopathic medicine and what inspired her to come up with Baxbag
  • The process of finding the right manufacturer to create a sustainable backpack
  • What led Dr. Zee to crowdfunding and why Indiegogo was chosen as the platform to launch Baxbag
  • The biggest surprises that Dr. Zee encountered in the product development process

Links

Sponsors

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Transcript

View this episode's transcript
Roy Morejon:
Welcome to Art of the Kickstart, your source for crowdfunding campaign success. I’m your host, Roy Morejon president of Enventys Partners, the top, full service, turnkey product development and crowdfunding marketing agency in the world. We have helped startups raise over a hundred million dollars for our clients since 2010. Each week, I’ll interview a crowdfunding success story, an inspirational entrepreneur, or a business expert, in order to help you take your startup to the next level with crowdfunding. Art of the Kickstart is honored to be sponsored by Gadget Flow. The Gadget Flow is a product discovery platform that helps you discover, save, and buy awesome products. It is the ultimate buyer’s guide for luxury gadgets and creative gifts. Now let’s get on with the show.
Roy Morejon:
Welcome to another edition of Art of the Kickstart. Today, I am really excited because I’m talking with Dr. Zee. Dr. Zee is the founder of Baxbag about to launch an Indiegogo or likely when you guys are listening to this episode, it’s already live on Indiegogo. So make sure to go and check it out. And Baxbag is really unique. I mean, not only is it good for your health, but it’s good for the planet. And I think we can all agree that we need more products out there in the world that are good for the planet. Baxbag is a sustainably engineered posture backpack. So it’s designed to be the most comfortable backpack for whatever your day has in store. And many people today don’t even know what today looks like, or what they’re going to be doing. So Dr. Zee, thank you so much for joining us today on Art of the Kickstart.
Dr. Zee:
Thank you so much Roy, for having me. I’m excited to talk about this and its need and everything else that comes with Baxbag.
Roy Morejon:
Absolutely. So, yeah, I mean, just for the audience’s sake, give us a little bit of your background and what inspired you to create Baxbag.
Dr. Zee:
Okay. So I’m a naturopathic medical doctor, and I specialized in biochemistry. I got my bachelor’s of science in biochemistry. So I had to carry it around really heavy books for eight plus years in medical school as well. And then on top of that, I’ve always had a passion for traveling and I’ve been to almost 50 countries now, I’ve done a lot of study abroads. I did a lot of volunteer work and just holidays as well, all of the above. So I just didn’t like the way my backpack felt, even though it was part of my everyday life.
Dr. Zee:
And I started to notice the toll it started to take my posture because again, super heavy books. And I did [inaudible 00:02:44] when I took my backpack off, my shoulders would be sore my back would be sore. It was so uncomfortable in so many ways. And I started actually, while I was in medical school, I started trying out all different posture correctors. I’m sure a lot of people have seen those little straps you put on around your shoulder that you can wear. And I bought 15 of them trying to find one that I liked that worked. And they just didn’t. I mean, it would help me to stand straight. Yes. But they were so uncomfortable. They would dig into my shoulders. They would dig into my armpits. They were not aesthetically pleasing. And I even wore them to medical school to avoid the pain I would feel of it digging into my skin.
Dr. Zee:
I would put on a sweat shirt, and put the posture corrector on top of my sweatshirt, not caring how ridiculous I looked because it’s medical school, so and nobody cares if you’re trying to do something to help your health. And they appreciate it if anything, and it just, it was awful. I even tried wearing it to sleep so I didn’t have to think about it. And then one day I started playing around with my backpack and I just started thinking, huh, why can’t my backpack be correcting my posture? I mean, the straps are there. And I started… I crossed the straps over on just a regular backpack, just to try it out. And I put it on my back and the journey began there. Because what I experienced was holy shit, this can actually work.
Roy Morejon:
There goes all of our G listeners. I’m just kidding. No. So I love the fact that obviously there’s a pain point, literally with the product that you were using before, just the regular backpack, heavy books in there. And then you start obviously doing the product research, seeing what else is out there, buying it, trying it, seeing that none of those solve the problem. And then you create your own product out of that. And I think that’s where some of the best products come out of is terms of solving the problem that you have in your life and likely millions of other people do as well. So given that this is likely your first foray into the product development side of things. Talk a little bit about beginning that process and how you went about deciding what features to include in the Baxbag.
Dr. Zee:
Oh man. So this was tough for me at that time because it was a moral decision for me too, in terms of what type of life I wanted to lead, what type of product I wanted to create, what type of impact I wanted to have. If I was going to do this. At the time I was selling on Amazon, just random things, making passive income. And it was cool. And I had contacts to manufacturers, and one of them actually created backpacks, already. And I knew if I reached out to them to create this backpack, it would take just a few months and it’d be fine, but they were just a regular factory. They would make regular Baxbags and it would have been cheap to do at the same time. But I had an internal conflict about this. I’m a millennial, I’ve seen what’s happening to our world.
Dr. Zee:
I’ve seen how things… Literally are world burning to the ground in places, and with climate change and all of the above, and just kind of… I’m trying to understand what life I wanted to lead, and what I wanted to do. So it took some time and real consideration to really commit to, at that point, deciding if I’m going to do this, the only way I’ll do it is in a way that’s sustainable, in a way that’s eco-friendly. In a way that I will not feel guilty, will not feel remorse, will not feel like I’m adding to the planets weight. So that became hugely important, it took a few… I would say a couple of months of really some soul searching I would say, to decide that. And from there on… So I didn’t even end up reaching out to those manufacturers. And from there on, I just decided to start reaching out to places that I could find a sustainable material being used.
Dr. Zee:
And I started with Alibaba, trying to come up with what materials I even wanted to use, what options there were for eco-friendly materials. And I started to realize, Vietnam is a great place for creating sustainable material. Also of course, China. Also of course, Taiwan. And just kind of started from that angle, trying to find what could go into making the Baxbag.
Roy Morejon:
So how many different product iterations have you gone through now?
Dr. Zee:
Oh, okay. So I was very optimistic in the beginning I was very headstrong. But I was like, “I’m going to get this done in two prototypes and I’m going to launch, and everything’s going to be fantastic.” And everyone was telling me “Hey, Shaf, this is going to take awhile.” Or, “Hey, Zee, it’s going to take a while.” And this is… it’s going to take more iterations than that. But I was overly confident, I was overly ambitious coming from the academic background. I was like, “I know how to make this work. And it can’t be that hard.” But obviously it is, it’s been a year and a half later that I’m finally launching. And it’s about eight prototype iterations later as well. I would say luck was definitely on my side in being able to find the right manufacturers that were willing to take on a project that was completely innovative and novel.
Dr. Zee:
Because it turns out a lot of manufacturing companies are run by people who have manufacturing degrees. And they will not take on startups, and they will not take on projects that doesn’t have an already proven business model. That doesn’t show them that they will get their money back if they invest into creating this product. And obviously that wasn’t the case for Baxbag. So I would say there were some synchronicities that happened. Because I started reaching out to product designers of sustainable products. And one of them was Joey Pringle who created, at the time, the world’s most sustainable backpack in the world.
Dr. Zee:
And I reached out, and it was in the middle of the night. It was like a sleepy LinkedIn message. Just last ditch efforts that I just… It’s something got to keep at. You have to be tenacious. You have to really keep trying. And eventually, it’s going to be a miss, miss, miss [inaudible 00:00:09:04]. I had a hit, and then it’d be maybe not exact match, but then I gained insight into what material I could use instead versus something else. So even if you don’t end up finding the right manufacturer, you end up having more knowledge of the industry, and more knowledge of the choices you have for your product at the same time. So I reached out to him and it turns out he was in the process of creating a manufacturing company that was aspiring to be the sustainable bag factory of China, literally.
Dr. Zee:
And working with a manufacturing company called [Dishin 00:09:43] in China, where the two people in charge there already had been creating the leather goods for the last 10 plus years. And they had some spiritual awakening. They turned into Buddhist. If you know Chinese people, their diet is largely consistent of meat. And these are vegetarian people. They’re vegans actually I should say. And so they were shifting away from using any type of animal product and gearing towards really creating a company, a manufacturing company for the future. Because they knew that this is where we’re all heading. We’re going towards value based decisions and value based product designs. So, and luckily for me, these people in charge, aren’t just manufacturing degree holders. They were actually design degree holders. So they were willing to take on the challenge that Baxbag was, in terms of creating a completely novel design.
Dr. Zee:
And I flew. So I live in Singapore, I flew to [Guangzhou 00:10:45] China to meet with the factory owners in person because they were telling me, oh, we can do it online. We can figure this out. I was like, “No, no, no, no, no. You don’t understand. You need to understand this product in person.” Which actually was pivotal in this design creation being done right. Was me going to the Guangzhou, and meeting them in person and showing that on their bodies, how the backpack design needed to change and how it completely changed anatomically they’re structure when wearing a backpack in this design. And when they saw that in person, I saw their eyes light up. They’re like, “Oh, we get it now.”
Roy Morejon:
How many iterations do you think that trip saved you?
Dr. Zee:
Oh my goodness. Probably at least three to four, I would say, probably yeah. Starting off right with the understanding how the straps needed to be constructed in person definitely… I mean, I can only guess.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah, no, I can imagine that. I mean also I know that’s always been an issue with minimum order quantities for startups as well, trying to get in with factories. And it sounds like the relationship certainly helped out there. And then meeting in person and being able to do that. And then come to terms with the upcoming start of your company and hopefully future purchase orders from them outside of the initial one.
Dr. Zee:
A thousand percent, I would say the relationship I created with them has hugely been a core of this product’s creation, and to completion. Because this was out of everyone’s comfort zone and which isn’t necessarily something a manufacturing owner wants to be spending time on. It was, I sold myself to them in person and I sold them, of course, the idea and the product. But the relationship like you’re describing was hugely important. I recommend anyone if they have the opportunity, and if they really believe in their product, and they really believe in themselves to really focus on that relationship creation too, because meeting them in person was magical. There was so much alignment in our attitudes around about the world, what we wanted to create, our values, and that played a huge role in them really sticking to it with me.
Dr. Zee:
Because it was tough, eight prototypes, eight iterations is a lot of different ways of trying to create this. And also not coming from a manufacturing background or design background to any degree. Having these people understand me, where I could like take a video of a part of the bag and be like, “Hey, this buckle needs to move this much here.” And they were willing to be able to understand the way I communicated, not coming from that type of background, which was hugely helpful on top of that. One thing that I want to note is hugely important is to create the tech pack, to find someone… For me, I found someone on Upwork who designs, technical package designs of products. That really goes into all the specs of what you’re trying to create. So getting what is in your head onto paper, in a diagram format, in the way that has all of the metrics listed all of the materials intended materials listed, things of that nature. Is even prior to working with the manufacturing to really actually start to use their technology [inaudible 00:14:10] to make the product.
Roy Morejon:
Right. So let’s talk a little bit now you’ve got the factory, you’ve got the product, the prototype’s in a spot where you like it, love it, think it’s ready to go. What led you into crowdfunding as a means of doing this initial launch?
Dr. Zee:
Well, I thought crowdfunding was for the little guy, which is what I am. So I was like, “This is a great idea. This is something necessary in the world. It feels great. It looks great.” What I had in mind. So testing your idea and validating it is hugely important even prior to publication. So that’s one of the reasons why I wanted to go into crowdfunding, because it was to validate the idea. It creates brand awareness of the product. You can test what works and what doesn’t work in terms of copy, in terms of marketing material, in terms of price points. There’s a lot of things you can play with because of crowdfunding and people are forgiving enough to understand that you are either the little guy trying to make your dream come true. Which I really appreciate in terms of people who are interested in backing a crowdfunded project. And also people just want to be up to date on the latest, coolest products in the world.
Dr. Zee:
And crowdfunding is a great place to also find that. And I think Baxbag is definitely one of the most innovative products in terms of challenging the entire backpack industry to its very core. I think it’s great in that way. So I started off, just with some landing pages with a 3D mock up of the Baxbag even before of course the product was created. To gain insight into people even wanting the product. And we had pretty good traction, thousands of people signed up with their emails, just based off of a 3D picture of Baxbag, not even the product. So that was good. And when I was doing that on the landing page, I actually had at the bottom written that we’re launching on Kickstarter. So my initial intent was to launch on Kickstarter, just because it’s a large brand name that a lot of people recognize.
Dr. Zee:
That was my understanding. Then someone from Indiegogo found my landing page, reached out to me, we had some conversations and he informed me that if I signed an exclusivity letter of intent agreement with Indiegogo, then Baxbag would be sent out into their newsletter, has potential to be on the front page of Indiegogo. If I meet certain metrics, I get this aero design thing, which doesn’t even apply to Baxbag, but there was just perks that I really liked, and I was excited by. I said, “Okay, sure, I’ll switch over to Indiegogo.” So that was really what made me switch to Indiegogo, but that was last year in September, actually. So it’s October now. And I’m happy about that decision because I’ve come to realize that Baxbag is a lot more of an Indiegogo product too, in terms of its own branding and the hardware functionality that it is, more so than Kickstarter. And I think I like how Indiegogo has grown over the last year in their own marketing and their own infrastructure. So I’m really happy about the decision from that regard too. But that’s why I ended up choosing Indiegogo, actually.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah. I was going to ask what was the decision making there. So I appreciate you sharing that. And yeah, we’ve seen some great campaigns on the Indiegogo platform in terms of the exposure that they can get. Certainly on the product design side, which I think your product lends itself very well to that community that they have over there.
Dr. Zee:
Yeah. I’m excited now. It’s just, I know people will be hearing this later, but we’re launching in one week. So excitement and nervous all at the same time.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah, no, I know how that can be, interviewing lots and lots of founders on the show. So you’re in similar space there. Obviously there’s a lot of tension and nervousness before launch, given that it’s a week out, but we’ll be live once the campaign goes out there. So what’s been the biggest surprise I guess so far of bringing a product to market, and next steps launching it out there to the world for everybody to see?
Dr. Zee:
The biggest surprise of the Baxbag, I think to me is just how simple I was able to make the design, which was my goal. I don’t know. So it’s that… And so I would say to surprise and the second one would be, it’s not easy getting the word out. That is something that I’m struggling with right now. That I’m trying really hard to… I’m staying up most nights, just individually, genuinely reaching out to all the people that I think will be interested in the product, especially since we’re a week out. Journalists, influencers, et cetera. I guess I’m surprised. I think I was naive to think that it would just be… There would be a little bit more of some self-growth even because it’s such great product, everyone should like it, but actually that’s not how most businesses work, even if it’s an amazing product.
Dr. Zee:
So, so I would say things of that nature. And then also just because it’s kind of a, what do you call… A double-edged sword because I made it so seamlessly integrated the posture correcting components into the backpack,, with the goal of replacing the mainstream backpack. That’s why I didn’t want to make it look like a totally new age design. That’s like completely different and obviously is posture correcting, something like that. I didn’t want to do that. That wasn’t the goal. But because it’s so seamless in terms of the way the design is, and integration, and the effect it has, people are confused. Because when they see the bag, they’re like, “Wait, I don’t get it. This looks like a regular bag, but like a nice looking regular bag.” And so it’s a double-edged sword in that way. And that’s been a surprise, which I could have seen coming. So those would be a few of the many surprises I would say.
Roy Morejon:
So after this campaign is over, where are you headed next?
Dr. Zee:
I’m going to… So right now I’m in London, I’m visiting here. I’m here. I was recording videos by people that here in London, one of them is testimonial by Dr. Justin Holmes. He wrote chiropractor who works out of Harley Street in London, which is a really prestigious place for medical practices. And I’m getting testimonial videos and things of that nature. And I’m going to then go home back to Singapore where all my friends are, my community is, and all of my friends are missing me, and I left because I wanted to focus on this launch and separate from all of those things. I’ve just been pretty much alone just working, I’m not meeting that many people unless it’s work-related. But it’s been super helpful to just, the grit to just punch away at this, get it done. I’m hoping to be back in Singapore after the lunch, it is COVID so travel in general is kind of up in the air, but that’s my goal.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah. Well, Dr. Zee talking about launches, this is going to get us into our launch round where I’m going to rapid fire a handful of questions at you. You good to go?
Dr. Zee:
Yeah.
Roy Morejon:
All right. So what inspired you to be an entrepreneur?
Dr. Zee:
So I never actually knew what an entrepreneur was, or wanted to be until I was already in the space. So when I was in medical school, I started three different companies while in medical school. And this was just born out of a desire to create solutions. And I didn’t know, oh, sure… I didn’t know that it was being an entrepreneur until I was already being an entrepreneur. If that makes sense. And I was partaking in Google startup competitions, and I won a couple of those actually. And it’s just the way I’m wired is to be more solution driven and solution focused. And that’s just why I became an entrepreneur in that way. And I think everyone in the world, to some degree can be an entrepreneur. Because what is being an entrepreneur if just not self-empowered decision-making and self-empowered solution creation.
Dr. Zee:
That’s all it really is. And you can be an entrepreneur even within an institution, in my opinion, because that’s what it is. It’s not even just about just doing something on your own. It’s not just about separating from the nine to five. It’s just making self-empowered solutions that benefit either your company, or the world, society, whichever the case. And also to add, I would say that I’m… After realizing what the entrepreneur stereotype is. I realized that I was very cliche entrepreneur in terms of my story, my upbringing, I didn’t fit in. I couldn’t hold a regular job because I was always doing things to the beat of my own drum. I always, I thought something was wrong with me, for half of my life because of it. And, yeah, there’s a lot of different stories I could go into here that just are very cliche in terms of me being kicked out of places, or me trying to do something that went against the grain, et cetera. So, and here I am now.
Roy Morejon:
Well, we’ll save those for another episode, but I appreciate that. So if you could meet with any entrepreneur throughout history, who would it be?
Dr. Zee:
Yeah. So I would actually say currently someone who’s right now is Gary Vaynerchuk, Gary V.
Roy Morejon:
Yep.
Dr. Zee:
Yeah. And the reason why I look up to him is simply because he’s heart-centered and I believe myself to also be heart-centered, in terms of the way we operate. And I have a software company as well that are launching and it has a focus on connecting people. And it’s the focus on being heart-centered connection as well. And so it’s hard I’ve already been pitching to venture capitalists. I’ve been in this scene for a while in the startup scene. And it’s kind of crazy when you… It’s a cold world, very metric driven and not always in the best interest of humanity at the same time. And I look up to him because he partakes in venture capitalism. He partakes in this startup scene, but brings in that angle of heart-centeredness, and brings in that angle of progressing humanity and people, think that that’s not possible with this industry, but it is. And he’s a perfect example of it. And there’s not that many examples, unfortunately, which is why I look up to him because he’s really spearheading it.
Roy Morejon:
Absolutely. So the Dr. Zee and Gary V. podcast coming to you soon.
Dr. Zee:
Oh, cross fingers, that would be a dream.
Roy Morejon:
So if you did have the chance to have a cup of coffee, or a glass of empathy wine with Gary V., what would be your first question?
Dr. Zee:
I would straight up, go into how we make social media great again. And the ways we are making social media great again. And I think his mind would blow because I think what he seeks in the world, and what he tried tries to create and be involved in is exactly what I have created in terms of connecting people, Community Without Borders and my social media platform. It’s called Vibeo like Vibe-O, video with a B. And it’s a place where you vibe on video with people. It’s where you have face-to-face conversations via video, based on topics. So you actually can post video messages to topics that people can respond to. And you can also go live with people via video, based on topics you’re interested in. So it’s like, you know how TikTok is a channel for people to communicate via dances, choreographed dancing?
Roy Morejon:
Sure.
Dr. Zee:
Vibeo is the same exact channel, except for conversations. And in a completely intuitive, simplistic, streamlined way. So it steps away from the broadcasting self promotion that social media has today, and steps into a place of just heart-centered connection over things that matter. You just vibe with people, you find people to vibe with online. And that’s, I think in this day and age where we have a lot of ways to connect online, but we don’t have on the internet. And I would just straight away go into this need to connect people. And as a doctor, the core to healing beyond genetic factors, beyond nutrition, beyond pharmaceuticals, beyond spiritual medicine, beyond any of these other components, the core to human health and healing, is actually human connection and community. Which is what this product is meant to bring into the world. And I would just straight away go into that with him.
Roy Morejon:
Beautiful. What book outside of Gary V’s books would you recommend to our listeners?
Dr. Zee:
I actually, so I would recommend, as a woman entrepreneur, it’s obviously a different journey. And so some of the books I read growing up were by this author named Anais Nin, she’s incredible. And it really helped me to embrace my sexuality and sensual behavior. And just my femininity as a woman through her books. Because her books are very risky, very edgy, but it was beautiful to get in the mind of this woman in these books and how she was as a character. When I recommend anyone to read her books, I mean, a lot of her quotes are all online. And I think that femininity is repressed in the world as a whole, both for males and females.
Dr. Zee:
And to be able to embrace that about myself has been huge in being able to be a whole woman. Because it’s not something that generally can be accepted in the world of business. And I think that’s something that needs to change. It’s not something I need to change about myself and repress. I think the opposite, I need to fully be the whole woman that I am, and this was helpful and cultivating that confidence in my earlier years.
Roy Morejon:
That’s great. Dr. Zee, where do you see yourself in three years?
Dr. Zee:
I see myself living in London. I do believe I’m going to move from Singapore to London next. And hopefully I see backpacks changing around the world, major industries reinventing. I hope that maybe they will want to license the patent from Baxbags so that they can also incorporate the posture correcting technology into their backpacks to help the world combat the effects of kyphosis on the body, which is hunchback. We are experiencing an epidemic in the world from our technology use and just from being at home, because of social isolation and down, and all of the above. So it’s definitely something we don’t think about. It’s just a pain we’ve accepted with regular backpacks and the way we are with technology today. And we really need to focus on how we can combat the defect that takes place that creates all these other symptoms, and pain points for the body. So I’m hoping that in three years that this will be a lot more widespread of a technology being utilized to help the world.
Roy Morejon:
Absolutely. Now I know the campaign hasn’t launched on Indiegogo yet, but interested still to hear your take on what the future of crowdfunding looks like.
Dr. Zee:
Yeah. So I would say it isn’t… In the last few years, I had to learn the hard way through trying to launch, is that it isn’t as much for the little guy anymore. You need money to crowdfund. You need money to make money on crowdfunding. Because I think these platforms have been overrun by larger companies and institutions that are using the platform to play around with an idea and create the same type of information that I want. Which is the brand awareness, and to understand what marketing works, what doesn’t work, AB tests, price points, et cetera. But large companies are using these platforms for it. So it’s, I feel like I’m like, “This is unfair.” But obviously not everyone needs to do what’s best for their company, but I I’m hoping that there is a way to kind of level out this balance in these platforms.
Dr. Zee:
But at the same time, I think there will be more platforms coming out as a result of the fact that I think Indiegogo and Kickstarter are kind of infiltrated by larger corporations that just have, I would say like even a hundred thousand dollars just to spend on a crowdfunding campaign. When it’s like, hey, what about us? So I see it changing in that way hopefully. That more options for people like myself who don’t have that a hundred grand to make it work. And quite frankly, if this launch doesn’t work, then Baxbag is a bust. This is going to make or break the company. And even no matter how much of a necessary product it is, and simple it is, and designed well, all the above, I have all the bases covered, but if I don’t reach the minimum order requirements, then it’s a bust. And to have platforms that really cater to people in my position, versus people that have a lot to spend and don’t really need it for really making their dream come true. I think hopefully there’ll be a better differentiation between those types of entrepreneurs.
Roy Morejon:
Yeah. I agree. Well, Dr. Zee, this has been amazing. This is your opportunity to talk to our audience. Give them your pitch, tell them what you’re all about, where people should go, and why they should check you out.
Dr. Zee:
Okay. Yeah. Please go to Baxbag.com, First and foremost, B-A-X-B-A-G and you’ll find the link to go to the Indiegogo campaign. Hopefully it’s doing well. Hopefully you can reach out to me on Instagram at Instagram.com/Baxbag, to hopefully maybe congratulate. I don’t know what’s going to happen between now and then, but crossing my fingers. And if you feel called to support this product, please share. I only want you to, if you feel aligned with the vision of the company, with the ethos of the company, with the sustainable components of the company, please share with your friends, your family, your ex’s. I actually shared with my ex yesterday, like, please can you share this? Because right now, it’s just a matter of getting the word out. And hopefully if you are interested in the product for yourself, just know that it feels amazing on your back.
Dr. Zee:
The cushion, it’s like a high-end computer chair on your back. Somebody told me it feels like a hug. Feels like you’re being hugged from the back, it’s really nice. People put it on. And they’re like, “I don’t want to take it off.” I recommend to watch the testimonials video, it’s on YouTube, just search Baxbag. And you can see people’s authentic reactions to wearing the bag. And maybe you can have that for yourself. And also I plan to put in a card, a biodegradable card, with seeds inside each and every Baxbag that’s being shipped out to the world, so that everyone in the world who gets a Baxbag, will be able to plant either it’s going to be a tree, or a kind of plant that I think would be beautiful, also at the same time. So it’s beautiful. So if you… So please be sure and support, that’s all.
Roy Morejon:
Awesome. Well, audience, thanks again for tuning in. Make sure to visit ArtoftheKickstart.com for the notes, the transcript, links to the campaign over on Indiegogo, and everything else we talked about today. And of course thank you to our Crowdfunding Podcast sponsors The Gadget Flow and ProductHype. Dr. Zee, thank you so much for joining us today on Art of the Kickstart.
Dr. Zee:
Thank you, Roy.
Roy Morejon:
Thanks for tuning into another episode of Art of the Kickstart, the show about building a business, world, and life with crowdfunding. If you’ve enjoyed today’s episode, awesome. Make sure to visit ArtoftheKickstart.com, and tell us all about it. There you’ll find additional information about past episodes, our Kickstarter guide to crushing it. And of course, if you love this episode a lot, leave us a review at ArtoftheKickstart.com/iTunes. It helps more inventors, entrepreneurs, and startups find this show, and helps us get better guests to help you build a better business. If you need more hands-on crowdfunding strategy advice, please feel free to request a quote on Enventyspartners.com. Thanks again for tuning in, and we’ll see you again next week.